Now Playing Tracks

doubleadrivel:

weliveonfiction:

flatbear:

cumberbitch-in-a-tardis:

marin-fluently-sarcastic:

counterpunches:

Gordon Ramsay is my favorite.

i just want to hug all of them

Fun story. I cooked for this dude, once. I did my kitchen apprenticeship at the family-style restaurant of one of New Zealand’s premiere chefs, and he knew Ramsay really well. He was in New Zealand for a few weeks, and Martin brought him by the restaurant to check it out. It was right on the beach, fucking gorgeous. I was the only one there (apprentice = bitch work = 4am starting shifts), and they asked me to whip up some breakfast for them. It was SUPER simple, fried fish, eggs cooked in bread, sausages. He was incredibly gracious and kind, asked me to join them (I couldn’t, too much work to do, so they sat at the kitchen window so they could talk to me), and was super interested in hearing about my english grandma, who had taught me how to cook. I won’t hear a single bad word against this man, for all of his kitchen hysterics, he treated me like an equal.

gordon ramsay fandom

If you’re not in the Gordon Ramsay fandom you’re wrong.

(Source: gordonramsaygifs)

heatherleighann:

pencilpaperpassion:

marauders4evr:

Wow, so I cannot draw.

That’s alright though. I’m more of a writer. And I have a story to tell.

I have always been disabled. However, up until eight years ago, I could still walk, run, skip, jump, etc. In November 2006, I had a surgery that left me almost paralyzed. I could walk short distances but had to spend the rest of my time in a wheelchair. I was scared and confused. I didn’t know what to do. One day, I turned on the small television in my hospital room and realized that there was an Avatar marathon on. Now, you must understand. I’ve watched Avatar since I was in the fourth grade – when the very first episode came out! So I sat back and eagerly watched the marathon, whispering the dialogue and humming along to the music. When The Northern Air Temple came on, I sat in stunned silence. I had forgotten all about Teo! Here was an epic, well-written, character who just so happened to be disabled! Even better, he was a character who didn’t let his disability define him! By the time I reached The Blind Bandit, I was grinning from ear-to-ear as I watched Toph take down the group of wrestlers.

Toph and Teo are two of the best characters with disabilities that I’ve ever seen. Both are shown to have their limitations. Nevertheless, they’re both mentally, emotionally, and physically strong! And most importantly, they overcome their limitations! Teo can still fly around with the rest of his friends and is able to protect his home when the time comes. Toph is still able to travel around with the Avatar and has proven herself to be an excellent fighter and the greatest earthbender in the world!

To me, it was as if these fictional characters were saying, “You can do this! Don’t listen to anyone who says otherwise. What do they know!?”

And eight years later, it seem that the tables have turned.

A large part of the Avatar fandom seems to be taking the news that Korra’s in a wheelchair very badly. I’ve seen so many depressing and nasty comments. Many people are wondering how the Avatar can still fight and keep balance while being in a wheelchair.

And every time I see someone comment about how Korra “can’t do this” I just smile and think, “Yes, she can.”

this brought tears to my eyes

I’m not in this fandom but I had to reblog

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

image

As previously mentioned, the most important factors in considering armor design for a character are:

  • What does it have to protect them against?
  • What do they have to be able to do?
  • What is available?

These suits are show casing some great armor made for a person who needs to protect themselves against swords and arrows, fight and lead troops on the battlefield and had access to a lot of money and an skilled armorer.  Unsurprisingly, they are super practical for their intended purpose.

The argument that they might wanted to trade off protection for a little more speed doesn’t hold up because once these guys got into battle it was simply ridiculous to think they’d be able to keep track everywhere an attack might come from.

Basically if you want to survive a battle, you want to be as well protected as possible, and as that video shows: The upper limit to how well protected you can be and still move freely is pretty damn high!

- wincenworks

lenyberry:

allistormiguelrichards:

joeywaggoner:

allonsyraerae:

remembermehiddles:

I love how the Ood is like ‘Dammit translator ball!’ and just hits it

This is why I really, really love the Ood.

Favorite Doctor Who scene.

The most misunderstood creatures in the fandom…

I love what Who did with the Angels and the Ood. 

They’ve taken something that people would automatically want to trust, an angel, and made them creepy as fuck.

And they’ve taken a thing that people would automatically respond to the visual of with revulsion and fear, and made them the sweetest, most peaceful creatures in the universe.

If that’s not the best “looks can be deceiving” ever done I don’t know what is.

(Source: retlawdisigny)

We make Tumblr themes